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HOW TO SAVE

If you just bought a few bottles of wine and want to save them a few years for that special occasion, you should take some precautions so that it does not spoil or even for it to age with quality.

1. Keep them in a cool place
Elevated temperatures cause the wine to age more quickly. If they are subject to very high temperatures, they risk losing their aromas.
Ideally, wine should be stored in a place where temperature is close to 13 º C.
If the bottles are in a place where the temperature exceeds 13 º C, do not worry. If you want to save the wine to consume within two years, you can store it in a place where the temperature can go up to 18 º C.

2. Few temperature fluctuations
When storing wine bottles, note that a wine needs a few variations of temperature. The variations cause the fluid within the bottle to expand (heat) or contract (cold), and may cause the cork to pop or even to allow infiltrations.
To ensure stable aging try to ensure that the wines do not suffer from oscillations larger than 3 ° C.

3. Turn the lights down low
Avoid sun exposure. Ultraviolet rays can degrade the wine and cause it to age prematurely. One of the reasons why wine producers use is colored glass bottles which is precisely to serve as a sunscreen to UV rays.



4. Moisture, but without extremes

Do not worry too much about moisture levels. Conventional wisdom says that the wines should be stored ideally in a place with a humidity level of 70%, but unless you're living in the desert, the artic, or passing through some very hot or very cold periods, moisture will not be a problem.
Theoretically places with very little moisture may cause the corks to dry, causing the air to pass into the bottle and spoiling the wine. Places with high humidity can cause mold, which doesn't affect a properly sealed bottle, but may damage the labels.

5. Keep them laid
Laid bottles allow the liquid to be in constant contact with the cork, which prevents the risk of the cork dry and letting air in.
If you have bottles with another type of lids, such as screw caps or plastic corks, you won't have to worry about this risk.

6. Little agitation
Many collectors argue that the vibration can damage the wine in the long term, by accelerating the chemical reactions of its contents. In case of older wines, significant vibrations can shake the sediments and prevent them from settling, causing a sandy sensation when tasting them.
If you want to consume them in short or medium term, you don't need to have major concerns about this issue, unless of course you decide to stir the wine as if you'd just the last Formula 1 race.


What is the ideal place to store wine?
If you have no storeroom or a basement, you can improvise and put them in shelves, in a safe place, without being directly exposed to the sun (such as near a window).
You should also be careful not to put them in a place where temperatures can damage the wine, like near domestic appliances.
If you think you do not have a place that meets these conditions, consider this: If a wine cooler, worth € 300, represents less than 25 % of what you annually invest in wines , you should better protect your investment and consider this option.

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